Book dating, technology takes a step forward

June 21, 2006 at 3:13 pm 1 comment

An interesting news article landed in my RSS aggregator today. Although this probably won't apply to most rare book dealers, it is interesting to see how technology is progressing for people in the trade. A biologist at Penn State University, whose hobby involves Renaissance prints and maps, has developed an interesting technique to date books, prints and maps. And most excitingly, it seems that his technique is pretty accurate.

Blair Hedges' "print clock" technique simply involves scanning images and then measuring the number of breaks in the individual lines that make up a print. By gathering data from thousands of renaissance prints, he revealed that the changes were usually clocklike on average, and therefore could be useful for calculating the printing dates of other art and books that currently are undated.

Lets hope that this sort of technology makes it to the mainstream and is easy for us to use.

The full article can be found here

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1 Comment Add your own

  • 1. Wilco  |  January 9, 2007 at 9:34 am

    Hey there

    Thanks for this great post it was just the missing info that i needed for a problem i have .

    I have bookmarked your site in the hope that you will bring more of this great stuff to the table

    Greets

    Wilco Breens

    Reply

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